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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
of assassinated opposition leader in tunisia. it is the country's democracy in danger of falling apart? for the first time in european union history, the government reveals a deal to cut the budget. >> ♪ i'll be there ♪ >> a kenyan voice is among thousands performing in china's new year television spectacular. we get the first ever backstage glimpse of rehearsals. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the birthplace of the arab spring is facing its biggest crisis since its revolution two years ago. tens of thousands of mourners attended the funeral procession in tunisia of the murdered opposition politician chokri belaid, a political killing that rocked the fledgling democracy and highlighted divisions between liberals, secular tunisian, and conservative islamists. >> there was genuine anguish across tunisia today. no or more so than in the home of chokri belaid. his wife and father sitting dignified. words of support to his daughter, whose father was assassinated on wednesday. a political murder that threatens to undermine to nietzsche's
of mourners attended the funeral procession in tunisia of the murdered opposition politician chokri belaid, a political killing that rocked the fledgling democracy and highlighted divisions between liberals, secular tunisian, and conservative islamists. >> there was genuine anguish across tunisia today. no or more so than in the home of chokri belaid. his wife and father sitting dignified. words of support to his daughter, whose father was assassinated on wednesday. a political murder that threatens to undermine to nietzsche's fledgling revolution -- undermined tunisia's fledgling revolution. >> my father wanted it to the democratic with a bright future. he always said the country was full of good things and believe political progress was possible here. >> as the coffin was carried through the narrow alleyways of this modest working-class neighborhood, the huge crowd name.ed chanting belaid's they blame the islamist-led government for his murder. chokri belaid had been its most constant and vocal critic. >> amid all the anger, there's a sense that tensions have been bubbling under the surf
in tunisia; fleeing the violence in syria and delaying a decision on gay scouts. but first, with the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a new round of fighting broke out today in damascus, syria-- the heaviest in weeks. rebel fighters made a thrust toward the central part of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build
stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on satu
, and conservative islamists. >> there was genuine anguish across tunisia today. no or more so than in the home of chokri belaid. his wife and father sitting dignified. words of support to his daughter, whose father was assassinated on wednesday. a political murder that threatens to undermine to nietzsche's fledgling revolution -- undermined tunisia's fledgling revolution. >> my father wanted it to the democratic with a bright future. he always said the country was full of good things and believe political progress was possible here. >> as the coffin was carried through the narrow alleyways of this modest working-class neighborhood, the huge crowd name.ed chanting belaid's they blame the islamist-led government for his murder. chokri belaid had been its most constant and vocal critic. >> amid all the anger, there's a sense that tensions have been bubbling under the surface for months. tunisia was the birthplace of the arab spring, and all of these mourners are determined there will not be a premature end here as well. >> there were sustain volleys of tear gas from riot police. as the wider regi
and around the globe. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters, who say he received repea
world news." our top stories -- tunisia in turmoil as thousands gather for the funeral of an assassinated opposition leader, chokri belaid. mourners accuse the islamist government of murder as a protest strike shuts down the economy. is this the death of a revolution? a former californian caught becomes america's most wanted after he dechairs war on former colleagues in the los angeles police department. >> of course he knows what he's doing we trained him. he was also a member of the armed forces. it is extremely worrisome and scary. >> and the ugly allegations behind the beauty of the bolshoi. we hear from the ballet star at the center of an off-stage storm. and jim see here with business news. >> thanks very much indeed. negotiations have been going on through the night, but the word is european union leaders are for the first time in its history close to a deal that actually cuts the budget. >> it's 12:00 noon here in washington, 7:00 a.m. in washington, d.c., and 1:00 in the afternoon in tunis, where thousands of people have gathered for the funeral of the assassin
a little work. >> the obama appointees this month. john brennan on why we allowed tunisia to let the sole benghazi suspect go free and then a visibly angry senator lindsay gralam, talking to leon panetta over president obama's absence of decisions in the attacks on the consulate in benghazi. >> ali an-hahairsi. the tukneesiance detained him, correct? >> he was taken into custody by the tunesians itch they released him? >> they did. >> where is he? >> naze tunisia. >> during that eight-hour period, did the president show any cureiosity about how this is going? what kind of assets do you have helping these people? did he ever make that phone call? >> look, there is no question in my mind the president of the united states was concerned about american lives -- >> with respect -- [overlapping dialogue] >> that incredible statement if he never called and asked you, are we helping these people? >> the questions raise more questions than offer any answers. is america a safer place or in more peril under the obama administration? are we safer or in more peril? >> it's an interesting question. if
week one of the men who helped bring rule to an end in tunisia was assassinated and france continues operations against al-qaeda and extremists in nearby mali. in egypt, there's growing opposition to president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in syria the civil war continues and it's gotten more complex in the wake of israeli air strikes to keep damascus from shifting weapons to nearby lebanon. here to help explain recrenate vents is jon alterman the director of the mideast program at the center for strategic and international studies. sir, thank you for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> so let's start. in north africa we have recent events in tunisia and we have the french operations in mali which least initially appear successful and scattering the al-qaeda elements and separating them from the tuareg and insurgents. how's the united states need to deal with this in a broad way? does it need to be getting involved in both mali and more broadly in the region? what do we need to be doing? >> if you're talking about intervention mali it's a question of what you're tryin
. >> an historic christ. turning now to tunisia where the country's prime minister announced he is resigning. his decision comes following the rejection of his attempt to form and a political government. he was trying to help the country out of the political crisis sparked earlier this month. an opposition politician was assassinated. what does this mean for the country? that is a topic i discussed with david rhode. why did the prime minister feel he had no choice but to resign? >> he had promised he would create a cabinet of technocrats that woodbridge to the political divide is widening in tunisia. he failed to do that. the islamist party refuse to compromise so apparently did the liberal party is and he kept his word and step down. >> he wanted a non-partisan government. was he so out of step with his country? >> he was out of step at all with the populace of two nations. there has been no agreement on a constitution. there were supposed to be elections in constitution but that is not happening. people are eager and they thought this was a historic opportunity with the assassination of a lefti
this week. listen to marco rubio cia director nominee john brennan on where we allow tunisia to let the seoul benghazi suspect go free and listen to lindsay graham questioning outgoing chief leon panetta on president obama's being around for the decisions in ben didghazbenghaz. >> the tone nobounisians detain. >> yes. >> they released him? >> they did. >> where is he? >> they ahe is still in tunisia. >> during the 8 hour period did the president show any curiosity about how this is going, what kind of assets do you have helping these people? did he ever make that phone call? >> look, there is no question in my mind that the president of the united states was concerned about american lives. >> with all due respect i don't believe that's a credible statement if he never called and asked you are we helping these people. >> the questions raise more questions and don't offer any sort of answers. is america a more safer place or in peril on president obama's care. >> if you are in for the drone program you feel happy about killing terrorists but i am concerned about lost opportunities in
television in america and around the globe. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters,
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
hearing begins in two and a half hours from now. >>> in tunisia today riot police filled the air with tear gas trying to keep furious crowds under control. have a look. these are the biggest and loudest protests in tunisia since the revolution there two years ago. the one that sparked the whole arab spring. a vocal critic of the government was shot dead outside his home yesterday. that infuriated people who say he was assassinated. it was political. they were already unhappy with tunisia's political situation since the arab spring the new islamist led government is keeping down individual freedoms. the people are not happy. tunisia's prime minister fired his cabinet and called for new elections hoping to calm tensions, then his deputy said the party wasn't unified on that. and it might not happen. we are watching developments. >>> let's gets back to our top story. a shooter on the loose in los angeles. the suspect a former cop is identified as christopher dorner. he was fired from the police force five years ago. and he might now be seeking revenge. dorner accused of shooting three los ang
government in tunisia is expected to be formed in the next few days. that's despite the alliance falling apart. the country is facing a political crisis after the assassination of an opposition politician last week. even a new government may not be able to help unify the deep political divisions. >> it is the latest dispute among a coalition beset by division. the leader of the coalition is now distancing himself from the party. he accuses the group of sidelining its allies and the dominating the government. >> there were political conflicts. every party would like to get something for himself or herself or itself to the next elections. >> and other secular member of the ruling coalition threatened to pull out, earlier. they all disagree. ho-- all disagree about how to end this crisis and what's best for tunisia. but the opposition has a different view. the popular front, a gathering of leftist parties, accuses ennhada of hijacking the 2011 revolution. >> the parliament has failed to draft constitution and tackle our problems. we are in a delicate situation and therefore we need exceptio
and that of former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> they insisted that the tunisia authorities did not have the evidence to keep him in custody. >> tunisias did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him? >> they did. >> where is he? >> still in tunisia. >> it doesn't sound like a good system to work with partners. >> they work the way we do. >> f.b.i. interviewed him for two hours in december after weeks of delay and following the personal intervention of the republican senator lindsey graham. he seemed to minimize the suspect's release. claiming the u.s. case was weak. >> we didn't have anything on him either or we would have made point to tunisias to turn him over to us. >> two weeks earlier in the benghazi hearing, secretary clinton said she spoke with mueller about whether the government's case could be made public. >> director mueller and i spoke about this at some length. there was not an ability for evidence to be presented yet that was cape to believe be presented in open court. >> clinton said the tunisians promised to keep tabs on him. >> we have been assu
we allowed tunisia to let the only benghazi suspect go through and listen to lindsey graham question leon panetta. >> doesn't sound like a good system working with our foreign partners. >> during that eight-hour period, did the president show any curiosity about how is this going, what kind of assets do you have helping these people? did he ever make that phone call? >> there's no question in my mind the president of the united states was concerned about american lives. >> with all due respect, i don't believe that's a credible statement if he never called and asked you are we helping these people. >> the questions raise more questions than offering any sort of answers so i asked is america a safer place or in more peril under president obama's war on terror. oops. we're not supposed to call it that. are we safer or in more peril, kimberly. >> if you're in the drone program, you are pretty happy about killing terrorists. i'm concerned about lost opportunities in terms of being able to get intelligence, to gather information and to be able to make a big gefer impact overall. it hasn't
up tonight, turmoil in the streets of tunisia. the developments today coming up next. >>> our coverage of that monster blizzard hitting the northeast continues. it could be the worst in 35 years. >>> still reeling after hurricane sandy and tonight we'll show you how volunteers play such an important role in helping people get back on their feet. >> i dropped my real job to do this. this is more important. so this is no juggling. there's just one ball in the air and it's called sandy. >> tonight we'll hear from a man >>> there's a growing crisis in tunisia tonight. a riot broke out there. the funeral of a political opposition leader in the city of tune is. there was an assassination on wednesday. police fired tear gas at thousands of mourners today. businesses and mass transit are on strike. for the first time in 30 years there. the arab springs uprising began in tunisia two years ago. until this week, that country avoided the recent chaos found in neighboring egypt. >>> some of the most intense conditions we've seen from the storm slamming the northeast are up in massachusetts
allowed tunisia to let the sole benghazi suspect go free, then listen to aa visibly angry senator lindsey graham questioning outgoing defense chief leon panetta and president obama's absence for much of the decisions p surrounding the terrorist attacks on our consulate in benghazi. >> the suspect in the benghazi attack and the tunisiansne detained him, correct? >> yes. >> he was taken into custody. released him. >> they did. >> where ishe he? >> he is still in tunisia. >> that's not a good system of working with our partner.ri >> during that eight hours, did the president show any curiousity about how isbo this going? what kind of assets do you have helpingdo these people? did he ever make that phone call? >> look, there is no question in my mind, the president of the united states was concerned about american lives. >> well, all due respect, i don't believe that's a crediblec statement if he never called and asked you are we helping these people? >> the questions h raised more questions than offering a any sort of answers. soy ask, is america a safer place or under more peril under presi
is on edge today. riot police in egypt and tunisia, bracing for more violence. protests have been happening there as you can see after friday prayers following the assassination after popular opposition leader in tunisia. remember, that was the birthplace of the arab spring two years ago. fox's's conor powell is live from jerusalem. conor, do we know why this tunisian opposition leader was murdered? >> reporter: he was an outspoken critic of the ruling muslim brotherhood party in tunisia. he was a leading figure in the arab spring revolution two years ago. on wednesday he was gunned down by an unknown assailant in front of his house. recently a muslim cleric in tunisia called for a -- his supporters turned out in thousands for his death. blamed the ruling muslim government for his death. although the tunisia prime minister denies it. he promised a full investigation and to catch those responsible for the murder. alisyn: do we have answer wlormt this assassination will spark more violence? >> reporter: we've already seen three days of violence and protest in tunisia and clashes with the poli
africa. in tunisia, where the arab spring began more than two years ago, a top opposition politician was assassinated today. chokri belaid was 48 and was gunned down today as he left his house in tunis. that sparked violent street protests and a promise from tunisia's prime minister to hold elections as soon as possible. we are about to get a reminder that winter can be harsh in the northeast. a major snowstorm is on the way and david bernard is our cbs news weather consultant. david, three questions: what? when? how much? >> we're going to answer all of those tonight, scott, and the answers probably aren't what people are going to want to hear. let's give you an idea of how big of an area this is going to cover. all of new england, the state of new york, northern new jersey, northeastern pennsylvania under a winter storm watch. this green area running the corridor between boston and providence, that's a blizzard watch that's in effect for friday and saturday. now, this is the weather map the forecast map for friday evening, and we think a major low will be just off of the jersey sho
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
-maliki. in tunisia, huge crowds of mourners protested as opposition leader chokri belaid was laid to rest. he was assassinated earlier this week. tens of thousands converged on the cemetery, with belaid's coffin draped in a tunisian flag. violence erupted as police fired tear gas and demonstrators threw stones and set cars ablaze. thousands of demonstrators turned out in cairo and other cities across egypt, protesting president mohammed morsi and his islamist-led government. the crowds defied hard-line muslim clerics, who called on their supporters to kill opposition leaders. as night fell, security forces used tear gas to disperse protesters who threw rocks and fire bombs at the presidential palace. gunmen in nigeria have killed at least nine women working to immunize children against the polio virus. the attacks today were in kano, in the african nation's muslim north. the killers were believed to come from boko haram, a radical islamic sect. polio remains endemic in nigeria, but some muslim clerics have charged the vaccinations are a plot to sterilize young girls. the british government to
that would have been a man, a shopkeeper self-taught and leading into tunisia. the best thing you can do is expect it might ignite at any time and to get ahead of it. so to get our friends in the middle east to reform before the people were in the streets was always trying to get ahead of what happened ultimately and egypt a and tunisia and other places to respect talk about the collapse of the soviet union in terms of what the scholars knew. you were right there. >> i was. we used to laugh when people would say that gorbachev is bound to fall from power. thank you. but when, this was the issue because, the general sense that things are going bad is not enough. people knew that the infrastructure, the political, economic, social soviet union was weak. i went to the soviet union the first time in 1979 to study language. i was there for an extended period of time and i was a student of the soviet military. i remember thinking i had this image of the soviet military as 10 feet tall. and i remember going into a store to buy some little thing for my family, and they were doing the computation
, and he was briefly held by tunisia. take a listen to this. >> tunisians did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him. >> they did. >> where is he? we don't know. >> he's still in tunisia. >> that doesn't sound like a good system of working with our foreign partners. >> it shows the tunisians are working with their rule of law like we do. >> i know mr. rubio wants to sound ready for responsibility and if he's got some very strong testicles, but dismissing the rules and practices of a foreign nation, that's hardly the most mature way to approach international terrorism, is it? >> oh, martin, that's poppycock. come on. we should have been able to force the tunisian government to do exactly what we wanted them to do. >> we're not even in any kind of conflict with the tunisian -- >> i'm kidding, of course. while marco rubio was trying and similarly we saw this in the hearing with hillary clinton, he was trying very hard to show that he is in command of the facts and he is ready to be, you know, presidential and handle this kind of information, and, instead, what he ac
and operate. you have problems in mali, egypt libya, tunisia, all across north africa and -- >> rose: you do indeed. so therefore the idea of taking out in yemen an american citizen who had threatened america was justine th dick chey? >> yes. >> rose: by a drone attack. >> yes. he was clearly part of -- >> rose: should there will be checks and balances in terms of that? should there be some way -- >> take him to court? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i think when we hire the president of the united states he gets to live in the big house makes all that money, he's getting paid to make difficult, difficult decisions. >> rose: and this president has been prepared to step up and make those decisions? >> some of them he has. in other ways he is limiting the capacity of future presidtsto do it. every time you take down our military capabilities, every time you start laying up carriers instead of refueling them, every time you cut the defense budget with a meat ax, which is what he's doing, every time you do that, you're going to limit the capacity of the president ten, 15 years down the road to take acti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)